celebrity news Entertainment

Jennifer Aniston is up for a Friends reboot & 8 interesting things

Written by Darius Rubics

(BBC News)

Jennifer Aniston says she, Courteney Cox and Lisa Kudrow have talked about a possible Friends reboot.

In a wide-ranging interview with InStyle, she added she “fantasises” about the show being brought back.

“Courteney, Lisa and I talk about it. I fantasise about it. It really was the greatest job I ever had,” Aniston said.

“I don’t know what it would look like today, but you never know. So many shows are being successfully rebooted.”

(Shows to have been brought back recently include Will & Grace, Gilmore Girls, The X Files, Roseanne and Queer Eye… with Buffy on the way.)

She pondered whether “Lisa, Courteney, and I could reboot The Golden Girls and spend our last years together on wicker furniture”.

(She’s probably joking about this but we kind of hope she isn’t.)

Here are eight other things we learned from the interview:

1. “First, with all due respect, I’m not heartbroken.”

Earlier this year, Aniston announced she and Justin Theroux were separating after two years of marriage.

“The misconceptions are ‘Jen can’t keep a man’, and ‘Jen refuses to have a baby because she’s selfish and committed to her career’,” Aniston told the magazine.

“Or that I’m sad and heartbroken. First, with all due respect, I’m not heartbroken. And second, those are reckless assumptions.

“They don’t know what I’ve been through medically or emotionally.”

presentational grey line

2. Women who don’t have children are considered “damaged goods”, she says

Since leaving Friends, Aniston has gone on to have a successful movie career – arguably the only former star of the series to do so.

Her big-screen hits include We’re The Millers, Horrible Bosses, The Break-Up and Marley & Me.

But the 49-year-old has been followed by headlines along the way, suggesting she has prioritised her career over starting a family.

“There is a pressure on women to be mothers, and if they are not, then they’re deemed damaged goods,” Aniston said.

“Maybe my purpose on this planet isn’t to procreate. Maybe I have other things I’m supposed to do?”

presentational grey line

3. Media headlines about her life have become “more and more absurd”.

It’s not just media stories about motherhood and her love life Aniston has struggled to escape over the years.

“For the most part I can sit back and laugh at the ridiculous headlines because they have gotten more and more absurd,” she said.

Later in the interview, McNearney asks Jen what the biggest misconception is about her, so the actress hits Google.

“Oh, look, I’m having a $100,000 revenge makeover!”

presentational grey line

4. Jen would struggle in a beauty pageant.

Not because she’s not good looking enough or anything, but because of the talents you have to perform.

“My talents are not baton twirling or Hula-Hooping or tap dancing or ventriloquism or yodeling.

“I would be eliminated right away. Out. No talent.”

presentational grey line

5. She has zero time for double standards in the media.

“When a couple breaks up in Hollywood, it’s the woman who is scorned. The woman is left sad and alone. She’s the failure. F that.”

presentational grey line

6. Fear of flying is the main thing she wishes she could overcome.

“It started in my 20s. It was a weird, scary flight,” Aniston explained. “Afterward I started noticing the stories on the news about plane crashes… So, yeah, that’s something I’d like to get rid of. It’s so irrational.”

presentational grey line

7. She may have (secretly) checked out your Instagram account.

The actress confirmed she doesn’t have social media accounts, but added she’s can be a “creeper” on Instagram.

“There are times when I’ll look through and think, ‘Oh my god, what a time suck!'”

She also added her name to the growing number of celebrities who are social media-sceptic, adding that such platforms are “fueling narcissism”.

presentational grey line

8. Women should be hired on merit, not just for the sake of it.

Aniston’s latest movie Dumplin’ is written, produced, and directed primarily by women, with female lead characters.

Praising the “extraordinary” team, she argued that women should not be hired for the sake of industry box-ticking, but on merit.

“We shouldn’t be shoving female directors and producers down each other’s throats because we have to. Then we’re making those decisions from a place of fear.”

About the author

Darius Rubics

Leave a Comment