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5 Ways Nurses Benefit from Compression Socks

Nurses are indeed the medical community’s heroes, performing their duties, without showing a tad bit of tiredness on their faces. As a nurse, working in extended shifts is your way of life, ensuring you give your patients the best possible care.

It is fine to take a minute and think about yourself. After all, you are also a human, just like others, with aching limbs tired from long shifts.

Thankfully, the compression socks are here to your rescue. They are a hit among medical practitioners, with an upward trend in their popularity. The compression socks for nurses help you reduce the swelling and pain in your feet and legs.

Are you still not convinced? Here are some valuable reasons why you should wear compression socks during your continuous shifts.

Reduce Soreness

When you work continuously and in 10+ hour shifts, it is most likely that your legs and feet will feel tender owing to constant walking and standing.

When you are always on the run all day long, lactic acid starts accumulating in your muscles, causing severe pain and discomfort.

Compression socks enhance the blood flow and, thus, increases the amount of oxygen traveling to your feet. Your muscles will eventually get rid of the accumulated lactic acid, relieving you from the pain up to some extent, you experience throughout the day.

Reduce Swelling

Just because your legs swell often, it doesn’t mean you have a heart condition. Since you stand for most of the time during your extended shifts, it causes a build-up of edema in your legs.

The durable compression socks prevent the development of excess lymph and manage to stabilize your feet and legs muscles, thus reducing the swelling.

Prevent Varicose and Spider Veins

When you stand for several hours, blood pools in your lower extremities, forming varicose and spider veins on your legs and feet. Since these enlarged veins carry more blood, they look blue, affecting the beauty of your legs. In the worst cases, they can be painful too.

With the compression socks, you can prevent the formation of new varicose and spider veins. Besides, these socks slow down the build-up of the existing ones.

Protect Your Legs from Blood Clots

Generally, doctors suggest patients wear compression socks before and after surgeries since continuously lying on the bed causes the blood to pool and clot.

The same applies to you while you spend long hours standing and performing your duties as a nurse. The compression socks are super useful, protecting your legs from blood clots.

The right combination of medicines and continuous use of the compression socks will prevent the blood clots from traveling up to your lungs.

Attractive and Helpful

The compression socks are helpful, providing support to your legs and feet; they are also colorful and attractive. You can brighten up your work attire with the great-looking socks, even in the strictest dress codes.

The compression socks for nurses increase breathability so that you don’t get itchy, and they don’t roll down like regular socks.

Compressions socks that are anti-microbial ensure they don’t stink, even after your 12 hours shift, making it a must for any nurse working long hours. A good pair of compression socks will ensure you take care of your legs while efficiently discharging your duties.

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About the author

Jimmy Rustling

Jimmy Rustling

Born at an early age, Jimmy Rustling has found solace and comfort knowing that his humble actions have made this multiverse a better place for every man, woman and child ever known to exist. Dr. Jimmy Rustling has won many awards for excellence in writing including fourteen Peabody awards and a handful of Pulitzer Prizes. When Jimmies are not being Rustled the kind Dr. enjoys being an amazing husband to his beautiful, soulmate; Anastasia, a Russian mail order bride of almost 2 months. Dr. Rustling also spends 12-15 hours each day teaching their adopted 8-year-old Syrian refugee daughter how to read and write.

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